Describe two ways you might provide support to this veteran with his or her ongoing PTSD and explain why it might be effective.

Posttraumatic stress disorder is a common traumatic reaction that active duty military personnel or veterans experience in relation to their prolonged exposure to combat duty. Their stories are often intense, filled with graphic details of their activities and of what they may have witnessed. Supporting active duty military personnel and veterans who suffer with PTSD takes skill and sensitivity. It also takes awareness of the traumatic reactions associated with PTSD; strategies to support the active duty military personnel, veterans, and their families; and self-awareness of experiencing vicarious or secondary trauma as a helping professional.

For this Discussion, review the media of combat veterans who suffer from PTSD. Select one combat veteran from the media and consider the strategies you might implement or recommend for supporting this individual with PTSD. Also, consider how you would mitigate any secondary trauma as a helping professional.

Please note that the military personnel in the media discuss graphic details of their combat experiences, which may be disturbing. Please consult your faculty if you experience trauma related to the media. If, after consultation, you feel you need further services, please contact the Walden Counseling Center.
By Day (2 to 3 pages)
Post the identity of the veteran from the media.

1.Describe two symptoms of PTSD he or she experienced.

2. Describe two ways you might provide support to this veteran with his or her ongoing PTSD and explain why it might be effective.

3. Finally, explain how you might mitigate vicarious or secondary trauma as a helping professional supporting active duty military personnel or veterans with their PTSD.

Select one current journal article to support your post. Provide full APA-formatted citations for your references.

Required Readings
Dick, G. (2014). Social work practice with veterans. Washington, D.C.: NASW Press.
Chapter 11, “Veterans with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder” (pp. 169-186)
Rubin, A., Weiss, E.L., & Coll, J.E. (2013). Handbook of military social work. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley.
Chapter 6, “Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) in Veterans” (pp. 81-98)
Chapter 7, “The Neurobiology of PTSD and Cognitive Processing Therapy (CPT)” (pp. 99-112)
Chapter 8, “Treating Combat-Related PTSD with Virtual Reality Exposure Therapy” (pp. 113-140)
Military.com Benefits. (2014). Post-traumatic stress disorder. Retrieved from http://www.military.com/benefits/veterans-health-care/posttraumatic-stress-disorder-overview.html
Bell, N. S., Hunt, P. R., Harford, T. C., & Kay, A. (2011). Deployment to a combat zone and other risk factors for mental-health related disability discharge from the U.S. Army: 1994–2007. Journal of Traumatic Stress, 24(1), 34–43.
Foreman, T. (2018). Wellness, exposure to trauma, and vicarious traumatization: A pilot study. Journal of Mental Health Counseling, 40(2), 142-155.
Johnson, W. J., Johnson, M., & Landsinger, K. L. (2018). Trauma-informed supervision in deployed military settings. Clinical Supervisor, 37(1), 102-121.
Neswald-Potter, Rhonda & Simmons, Robyn Trippany (2016). Regenerative supervision: a restorative approach for counselors impacted by vicarious trauma. Canadian Journal of Counseling & Psychotherapy, 50(1), 75-90.
Note: Retrieved from Walden Library databases.
Wallace, R. E., Cusack, S., Gulin, S., & Vrana, S. R. (2017). Therapist-Level Predictors of Vicarious Traumatization in Mental Health Providers. Therapist-Level Predictors Of Vicarious Traumatization In Mental Health Providers, 3. doi:10.1037/e512992017-001

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