he integration of technology has been a challenge to the field of nursing.

Reply 1

he integration of technology has been a challenge to the field of nursing. Technology and new equipment is designed to create a positive influence and help decreasing human errors. Some examples of technology in the nursing field are: automated IV pumps, portable monitors, smart beds, wearable devices, electronic medical record systems, centralized command centers, and telehealth (Nursing & Healthcare, 2019). Some nurses are resistant to change which causes a problem when introducing new technology to a nursing department. Due to nursing shortages, there may not be the time or appropriate staff to provide the formal training required to utilize the new technology and equipment to the fullest. We need to recognize that technology is used to help nurses but it cannot and will never replace the human element of nursing. This nursing problem should continue to be studied and researched to determine the best method for educating nurses on new technology and equipment. The more educational material and studies available, will hopefully make nurses less resistant to change. “A recent survey found that 82% of nurses agree that new technology and equipment innovation will positively impact patient care.” (Nursing & Healthcare, 2019). We just need to make sure that everyone is onboard with learning the new technology.

Reference

Nursing & Healthcare (2019). Western Governors University. 7 Nursing Technologies Transforming Patient Care. Retrieved from: https://www.wgu.edu/blog/7-nursing-technologies-transforming-patient-care1903.html

Reply 2

Menaldo 4 postsRe: Topic 1 DQ 2

I’ve been nurse for quite a while. Over the years, I’ve seen many pressure ulcers. I’ve seen many remedies and apparatuses to resolve and/or prevent pressure ulcers. In my current hospital, I work on the surgical unit. For every hip fracture admitted to my unit, we apply a soft boot to each foot (like a soft podus boot), and they are maintained until discharge with rationale being “people who have reduced mobility, or who spend extended periods supine (e.g. patients in acute and long‐term care facilities), have an increased risk for heel pressure ulcer development” (Greenwood, 2017). I work night shift, 7p-7a, and I remove them during my shift, and elevate my patients heels on pillows to float them. I remove them for a couple of reasons. Not only do they restrict my patient’s movement because they are velcroed on, but I find them so tightly put on that I worry about pressure from the straps. Also, my patients will tell me “thank you, they’re too warm”, when I remove them. Therefore, I would like to study the benefits of wearing the soft boots, compared to not wearing them to prevent pressure ulcers, for patients over 65 with hip fractures, over the next 7 days.

References:

Greenwood, C. E., Nelson, E. A., Nixon, J., & McGinnis, E. (2017). Pressure‐relieving devices for preventing heel pressure ulcers. The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews2017(5), CD011013. https://doi.org/10.1002/1465